analyse movie

analyse movie

Setting is a description of where and when the story takes place.
Editing is the way in which a film editor together with the director cuts and assembles the scenes. The way the scenes are joined together creates the rhythm of the motion picture. Scenes can be long and drawn out or short and choppy.

Analyse movie
Trailers work well to provide some context and tone prior to watching a movie, but they can also be filled with spoilers, which is why I do my best to avoid them when possible. As for reviews, reading about what others think of the movie before watching or writing a review can affect your opinion heavily. And when you’re in reviewer mode, you want to be as honest with your own opinion as possible, and not allow any outside voice to alter it. Of course, after the review is finished, I always welcome a discussion with fellow cinephiles to hear and understand what they enjoyed and didn’t.
Hands down, the most important component to address in a movie review is how it made you feel. Anyone can write a summary of a film or create lists about the highlights. But good reviews should convey to the audience how the movie resonated with you.

Analyse movie
On the one hand, film often reflects how people think about, for instance, political, social or even economic issues. On the other hand, film also moulds the way the audience thinks about those issues. It’s a dynamic process.
It’s a classic, gothic horror tale of the sort that were popular from the late 19 th century to the 1960’s. Crimson Peak is frequently misunderstood due to the audience’s understanding of modern horror. Modern horror is relatively unsubtle, with lots of gore and jump scares. The film’s marketing also contributed to this misunderstanding: it was presented to the audiences as a modern horror, emphasising on the few ghost scares in the film’s trailers.

Analyse movie
As the film opens, Sobel is attending his father’s funeral, but takes a cell call from Sing Sing, right there in the front row at temple. Turns out Vitti has turned goofy and does nothing all day but sing songs from “West Side Story.” Is he crazy, or faking it? Whether he’s faking it or not, he knows all the words. He gets no less goofy after he’s released into the custody of Sobel and his wife Laura (Kudrow), and placed under their supervision–in their home. Laura hates this idea, but the FBI insists on it: Vitti’s good behavior is Sobel’s responsibility.
“Analyze This” was never more than a sitcom, but the casting gave it an aura. De Niro as a neurotic mobster was a funny idea, and Crystal as a shrink was good casting because of his ability to seem smart even during panic attacks. Lisa Kudrow, then the shrink’s girlfriend, now his wife, has a nice off-balance disbelieving way with dialogue that plays against Crystal instead of merely out-shouting him, and there was also the mammoth presence of Joe Viterelli, as Jelly, the boss’ loyal chauffeur and sidekick. All of that worked the first time, and it kind of works, sometimes, in the second film. But the story has the ring of contrivance. If the first film seemed to flow naturally from the premise, this one seems to slink uneasily onto the screen, aware that it feels exactly like a facile, superficial recycling job.

Vitti’s archenemy is a mobster named Primo Sindone (Chazz Palminteri), who would strike if he had any suspicion of his rival’s weaknesses. That’s why utter secrecy is important, and why Sobol is horrified when he discovers his son eavesdropping on their sessions. “You cannot tell a single person!” he shouts at the kid. “You mean,” says the kid, “take it off the Internet?” Sobol is a divorced man about to remarry (to Lisa Kudrow), but Jelly comes for him even in the middle of a wedding, and it begins to look to his fiancee’s parents as if he’s a mobster himself.
“Analyze This” is funny partly because De Niro and Crystal do what we expect them to do, and partly because they don’t. De Niro kids his screen image from all those mob movies by Martin Scorsese and others, paying the psychiatrist compliments he cannot refuse.

References:

http://sdfilmfest.com/how-to-analyze-a-movie-step-by-step-guide-to-reviewing-films-from-a-screeners-point-of-view/
http://www.filminquiry.com/analyse-movies-introduction/
http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/analyze-that-2002
http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/analyze-this-1999
http://www.bartleby.com/essay/Analysis-Of-Two-Documentaries-FKX2SQYTJ

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