examples of movies in dimensional shapes

examples of movies in dimensional shapes

Short bio:
It is important that both two-dimensional and three-dimensional pictorial organization are about arranging a three-dimensional scene on the two-dimensional surface. The difference between them concerns how the three dimensional elements are organized to give us a two-dimensional composition. So the distinction has nothing to do with the invention of linear perspective. A picture can use linear perspective and still be composed in a two-dimensional manner.

First, as a class, we reviewed formulas for figuring perimeter, circumference, and area for 2-dimensional shapes. Then we reviewed the surface area and volume formulas 3-dimensional shapes. For example, I demonstrated how a 2-dimensional net consisting of 6 squares can be turned into a 3-dimensional cube, then we found the surface area and volume of the cube as a class.
The hit movie, A Wrinkle in Time, based on the book of the same name by Madeleine L’Engle, has kids of all ages jazzed. The story has elements of family, love, friendship, mystery, danger, and even the fight against evil. All of those are wrapped up in a plot of science, technology, and a bit of the supernatural.

Examples of movies in  dimensional shapes
Hex starts contemplating about the third dimension, but since that is “heresy” and unimaginable in Flatland, Hex’s investigations eventually get her and Arthur into trouble. But there is a “savior” — a sphere called Spherius from Spaceland who wants to educate the citizens of Flatland about the existence of the 3-dimensional world.
Flatland: The Movie is a short, educational 35-minute animated film based on an old novel called Flatland.

Examples of movies in  dimensional shapes
In Dziga Vertov’s Man with a Movie Camera (1929) a cameraman (Mikhail Kaufman) records the daily functions of a city and its citizens. The film is composed solely of imagery, void of intertitles, dialogue, and character development. The visually driven film celebrates contemporary city life and the forms that compose it.
4. Three Colors Trilogy – Color

Examples of movies in  dimensional shapes
I have to apologize for the following tip. If you haven’t noticed this already, it’s going to ruin a lot of films (like A Serious Man, seen above) and TV shows for you. Household lamps are perfect for adding pools of light across the background of your set. It can bring your actors away from their environment and stop the composition from becoming flat. Here’s the part which you might hate me for: Almost all practical lights used in the background serve no actual purpose to the scene or characters. In fact, in most circumstances, there’s enough light for there not to be a lamp on. However, in practicality, they do a good job of adding texture (and interest) to the background.

Light tends to build up on backgrounds and can start to flatten everything out. The gaffer looks for ways to break up the background or create variation, gradation, or particular highlights. If a scene takes place in a set with lots of windows, it is natural to scrape a slash of sunlight across the far wall, and across the furnishings. Large Fresnels or PARs are commonly placed outside of windows for this purpose.

References:

http://www.linkedin.com/pulse/math-movies-wrinkle-time-dr-valerie-camille-jones
http://www.homeschoolmath.net/reviews/flatland_movie.php
http://www.tasteofcinema.com/2016/10-films-that-best-represent-the-elements-of-art/
http://www.premiumbeat.com/blog/add-background-lighting-to-achieve-three-dimensional-space/
http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/film-studies

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